Tag Archives: open rpg creative license

Role announces its support for ORC

Open RPG

It’s been an interesting few weeks for the tabletop roleplaying community. Debates over open licensing have been at a high with a group of publishers coming together to announce a new license, ORC.

Role has announced that it will fully support all works published under the ORC initiative.

You can read Role’s full announcement below:

It’s been an incredible few weeks in the TTRPG community. We’ve seen & participated in the rise of a great tide of creators, publishers, and platforms charting a new destiny & embracing the open license-mentality that makes this medium so special and unique.

We’re pleased to announce that Role will fully support all published works under the upcoming ORC license initiative! 

Role has always been a community & platform that puts creators first. This has not changed. Our convictions around an open publishing ecosystem have never wavered. We believe in a TTRPG industry that embraces the community storytelling, game design, and innovation that is uniquely born from all of us working together.

Atlas Games announces its support for Paizo’s ORC License system

Atlas Games

With an unknown future concerning Wizard of the Coasts’ Open Gaming License, numerous other companies are stepping up with their own gaming license. Paizo recently released its ORC licensing system.

Atlas Games has announced its plans and where its company stands in the shifting and unknown future. Read their full statement below:

Written by John Nephew, owner Atlas Games

You’ve probably heard about the Open Game License controversy. In brief, after 23 years of consensus over what the OGL is and how it works, Wizards of the Coast appears to have planned to revoke and replace it with something else (an “OGL1.1”) going forward. Linda Codega at i09/Gizmodo broke the news, and they have been staying abreast of the story as it develops. 

As we wrote in an update to Planegea backers, though Planegea is published under the OGL1.0a and the SRD5.1, we do not see this having any effect on our delivery of rewards for that campaign.

But suddenly a lot of people are anxious about what the OGL means, after relying on it for 23 years. In the face of this uncertainty, a group of publishers led by Paizo Publishing and Azora Law are working to the Open RPG Creative (ORC) License, designer to service the needs of the RPG community and to be assigned to a non-profit entity rather than a single corporation and its potential future changes in ownership and agendas. We have great confidence in Azora Law (they handled our trademark registrations for AtlasGames and Open Upon a Time), and a long history of collaborating with many of the game companies involved. 

Atlas Games support the ORC. We have already released the WaRP System SRD under the OGL 1.0a, for Over the Edge; we expect to also release it under the ORC License as soon as it is finalized.

Going forward, we are considering other RPG rules and content that we can release under the ORC. We have long had internal discussions about  how to open up licensing of Ars Magica. We will look closely at the ORC License as the means to do so. Nothing is firmly decided, but we intend to deliberate in public and in conversation with the game’s community as we move forward. And we will be looking to the community for help with the work of making it happen.

Stop by our message boards if you have thoughts to share on this topic!

CLICK HERE TO READ THE BLOG POST

Paizo announces a System-Neutral Open RPG License

Open RPG

There’s been lots of chatter and rumors about Wizards of the Coast’s upcoming new version of its Open Gaming License (OGL) causing an unknown future in tabletop roleplaying. In response, Paizo has begun work on a new open, perpetual, and irrevocable Open RPG Creative License (ORC).

Since 2000, the OGL has improved the community, incubated creativity, and grown the business of not only the licensees but the licensor. A stated goal of a perpetual and irrevocable OGL was to ensure the establishment and longevity of gaming networks and to drive sales to both. Recent reinterpretation notwithstanding, it succeeded with roleplaying games seeing a golden age and creativity level not seen in decades. Many companies including Wizards of the Coast have benefitted from that growth.

The Open RPG Creative License (ORC) will be built system agnostic for independent game publishers under the legal guidance of Azora Law, an intellectual property law firm that represents Paizo and several other game publishers. Multiple leading publishers have already signed on to the effort to create a new and truly open license that allows all games to provide their own unique open rules reference documents that open up their individual game systems to the world.

You can find the complete details on Paizo’s blog.