Tag Archives: wizards of the coast

Channel Your Inner Rogue with 13 Heist Adventures in Keys from the Golden Vault

D&D players are not strangers to impossible missions. A perilous heist requires careful strategizing followed by daredevil antics when something unexpected happens and the players’ plan goes sideways. Dungeons & Dragons invites players to experience the thrill, drama, strategy, and intrigue of the heist genre in Keys from the Golden Vault, the latest Dungeons & Dragons book of adventures. Keys from the Golden Vault will be released in North America on February 21, 2023 and on March 24, 2023 in the UK/EMEA.

The Golden Vault is rumored to be associated with metallic dragons and based on one of the good-aligned Outer Planes. Its operatives help the downtrodden and innocent when the law can’t. The organization’s motto is: “Do good, no matter the cost.”

D&D players can live out their fantasies of running a caper like one they might have seen on the silver screen in movies such as Mission: Impossible; Ocean’s 11; or even The Great Muppet Caper. The thirteen adventures in Keys from the Golden Vault range from levels 1 to 11. They can be played as one-offs dropped into ongoing campaigns, or run as a campaign of heists perpetrated by the same crew.

Keys from the Golden Vault has an alternate cover by Simen Meyer, available only through game stores, and an evergreen cover by Anna Podedworna, available in North America on February 21, 2023. Fans who pre-order the digital/physical bundle at dndstore.wizards.com will be able to access the digital release on February 7, 2023.


Purchase (Standard Cover): Game NerdzAmazonMiniature MarketCoolStuff Inc.
Purchase (Alt Cover): Game NerdzMiniature MarketCoolStuff Inc.

Preview: Magic #23

Magic #23

(W) Jed MacKay, Rich Douek (A) Ig Guara (CA) Miguel Mercado
In Shops: Feb 01, 2023
SRP: $4.99

Discover the secret history of the War of the Spark in our multiverse, as revealed by the resurrected Jace Beleren!

Meanwhile on Amonkhet, Liliana, Garruk, and Chandra are trapped and have to watch helplessly while Ral is coerced into inaction while the man he loves is in danger.

But a betrayal from Nahiri complicates things, while a mysterious partnership is revealed to be behind it all…

Magic #23

Dungeons & Dragons OGL 1.0a is remaining in place, untouched

Dungeons & Dragons Players Manual

The feedback was clear, players want their OGL1.0a. Wizards of the Coast has a new update about the future of Dungeons & Dragons concerning their Open Game License (OGL).

To catch people up, a draft version of an updated OGL was leaked causing an uproar in the Dungeons & Dragons community over changes that included fees and restrictions. Recently, the D&D team has walked it all back promising a “working conversation” that included feedback before anything new was released. Well, the responses are clear with over 15,000 overwhelmingly against changes.

The big takeaway is that 88% do not want to publish TTRPG content under the proposed OGL 1.2. 89% of those who answered would be dissatisfied if OGL 1.0a was deauthorized. When it comes to Creative Commons and Systems Reference Document (SRD), 69% were satisfied and those who aren’t want more SRD in Creative Commons.

The results are pretty clear and the Dungeons & Dragons team seems to be listening. In a blog post, the team stated:

  1. They are leaving OGL 1.0a in place, as is. Untouched.
  2. They are also making the entire SRD 5.1 available under a Creative Commons license.
  3. Players can choose which they prefer to use.

Also included in the post is the SRD 5.1 with the Creative Commons license.

What’s next? We’ll have to see. But, the D&D community spoke up and the corporation has listened.

The Nerf Dungeons & Dragons Rakor Blaster unleashes its acid breath

The Nerf Dungeons & Dragons Rakor Blaster brings together the fantasy of Dungeons & Dragons: Honor Among Thieves and the D&D roleplaying game. The dart blaster launches 2 Nerf Elite foam darts in a row for active play in outdoor games. It is inspired by the black dragon Rakor, who unleashes acid breath upon any adventurer in the Forgotten Realms who dares challenge him for his treasure.

We open up and show off the new Nerf blaster and take a few shots.

See what we think!

You can get yours:
Amazon
Entertainment Earth


Hasbro provided Board Game Today with a FREE copy for review
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Betrayal & Mysterious Partnerships in Your First Look at Magic #23

BOOM! Studios has released a first look at Magic #23, the next issue from acclaimed comics writers Jed MacKay and Rich Douek, artist Jacques Salomon, colorist Arianna Consonni of Arancia Studio, and letterer Ed Dukeshire, about a series of mysteries plaguing fan-favorite planeswalkers all over the Multiverse, available on February 1, 2023.

Discover the secret history of the War of the Spark in our Multiverse, as revealed by the resurrected Jace Beleren! Meanwhile on Amonkhet, Liliana, Garruk, and Chandra are trapped, watching helplessly while Ral is coerced into betrayal while the man he loves is in danger. Nahiri’s shocking alliances complicate things, and a mysterious partnership is revealed to be behind it all… 

Magic #23 features main cover art by acclaimed artist Miguel Mercado, a polybagged Secret Planeswalker Variant Cover by French Carlomagno, and a variant by Stephanie Hans.

Magic #23

Dungeon & Dragons’ mechanics go Creative Commons while the Open Game License 1.2 is released

Dungeons & Dragons Players Manual

Wizards of the Coast has a new update about the future of Dungeons & Dragons concerning their Open Game License (OGL).

A draft version of an updated OGL was leaked causing an uproar in the Dungeons & Dragons community over changes that included fees and restrictions. Recently, the D&D team has walked it all back promising a “working conversation” that included feedback before anything new was released.

The latest update not only gives the first look at OGL 1.2 for feedback but the announcement that the core mechanics of Dungeons & Dragons will be given to the community through a Creative Commons license. Dungeons & Dragons’ core mechanics are being released under Creative Commons 4.0.

Creative Commons is a nonprofit that is focused on sharing information and knowledge. It has created a set of licenses that are a set of rules under which material can be used (for example you must attribute the original person).

If you want to use something more specific, that’s where the OGL 1.2 comes in which provides a “perpetual, irrevocable license to do so”.

Launched in 2000 for Dungeons & Dragons 3rd edition, the license allowed the use of a portion of the game for third parties to create compatible material. During the 4th edition, there was a more restrictive royalty-free license called the Game System License which took away some freedoms from the original license (though that was irrevocable and remains in use). Dungeons & Dragons 5th edition returned to the OGL and featured additional licensing options by publishing through the Dungeon Masters Guild storefront which allowed for the sale of content and creators could name their own price with Wizards of the Coast and OneBookShelf taking 50% of the proceeds.

The updated OGL 1.2 allows the D&D team to address hateful content and only applies to published tabletop roleplaying game content. It also is irrevocable.

What’s not present is royalty payments, financial reporting, registration, license-back, or a distinction between commercial and non-commercial. The announcement again reiterates that anything published under OGL 1.0a will continue to be so. There had been some headscratching questions concerting that.

You can read the full announcement and the Draft Open Game License 1.2 here. A survey is being released to gather feedback until February 3 and a new update will be released around February 17 and will continue until things are gotten “right”.

Wizards of the Coast promises a “Working Conversation” about the Open Game License

One D&D

Wizards of the Coast and Dungeons & Dragons have been experiencing a lot of backlash based on a leaked early draft for the next iteration of their Open Game License. After a stretched-out period of silence, the company finally addressed the issue last week addressing the goals for the update and some more details. Kyle Brink, the Executive Producer on D&D, has taken to the web to give a further update and promise a period of feedback from the community.

In addressing the path forward, Brunk apologized for how things were handled and the initial language for the updated OGL.

The company is switching gears focusing on being more transparent with the community and allowing for surveys and feedback about the update.

A new proposed OGL documentation will be released on or before Friday, January 20th at which point a survey and period of feedback will begin for two weeks.

Directly from the post, the new updated OGL will have no impact on at least the below:

  • Your video content. Whether you are a commentator, streamer, podcaster, liveplay cast member, or other video creator on platforms like YouTube and Twitch and TikTok, you have always been covered by the Wizards Fan Content Policy. The OGL doesn’t (and won’t) touch any of this.
  • Your accessories for your owned content. No changes to the OGL will affect your ability to sell minis, novels, apparel, dice, and other items related to your creations, characters, and worlds.
  • Non-published works, for instance contracted services. You use the OGL if you want to publish your works that reference fifth edition content through the SRD. That means commissioned work, paid DM services, consulting, and so on aren’t affected by the OGL.
  • VTT content. Any updates to the OGL will still allow any creator to publish content on VTTs and will still allow VTT publishers to use OGL content on their platform.
  • DMs Guild content. The content you release on DMs Guild is published under a Community Content Agreement with Dungeon Masters Guild. This is not changing.
  • Your OGL 1.0a content. Nothing will impact any content you have published under OGL 1.0a. That will always be licensed under OGL 1.0a.
  • Your revenue. There will be no royalty or financial reporting requirements.
  • Your ownership of your content. You will continue to own your content with no license-back requirements.

You can read the full statement here.

Dungeons & Dragons and IP Law: Getting Lawful Neutral with Linda Codega

Swift fan organizing gets the goods! Dungeons & Dragons planned to change how independent content creators could monetize their D&D-related work, but backlash caused the Hasbro-owned company to change the controversial plan. Hear what this Gargantuan news from the world of tabletop role-playing games means for comics fans and fandom at large with the TTRPG reporter who broke the story, Linda Codega.

Keep up with Codega’s reporting here https://gizmodo.com/author/lcodega

http://lindahcodega.com/ 

Listen to the GP Radio guide to getting into TTRPGs – https://bit.ly/ttrpgGP 

(via Graphic Policy)

Wizards of the Coast releases an update on its Open Game License

One D&D

There’s been a lot of chatter and protest against a leaked draft of the update to the Open Game License for Dungeons & Dragons.

Launched in 2000 for Dungeons & Dragons 3rd edition, the license allowed the use of a portion of the game for third parties to create compatible material. During the 4th edition, there was a more restrictive royalty-free license called the Game System License which took away some freedoms from the original license (though that was irrevocable and remains in use). Dungeons & Dragons 5th edition returned to the OGL and featured additional licensing options by publishing through the Dungeon Masters Guild storefront which allowed for the sale of content and creators could name their own price with Wizards of the Coast and OneBookShelf taking 50% of the proceeds.

With One D&D on the horizon, a new version of the license has been in the works and a leaked draft caused an uproar in the community. The unconfirmed leaks claimed the original OGL would be discontinued and the new 1.1 version would include royalty fees and greater rights to the material by Wizards of the Coast. This led to threats of protest and other publishers announcing their own open licenses.

Wizards of the Coast today released a response about the updated OGL which has still not been released.

The statement claims the revised OGL had three goals:

  1. The ability to prevent the use of D&D content in hateful and discriminatory products
  2. To address the use of D&D in web3, blockchain games, and NFTs, making it clear the OGL content is limited to tabletop roleplaying content like campaigns, modules, and supplements
  3. To ensure that OGL is for content creators, homebrewers, aspiring designers, players, and the community. It’s not meant for major corporations

The leaked draft’s section about royalties was to apply to large corporations attempting to use the OGL for their own content. The company has admitted they fumbled that and they can’t achieve all three goals.

The company has now stated the next OGL will focus on protecting and cultivating an inclusive environment and specify it only applies to tabletop RPG content. Educational, charitable campaigns, livestreams, cosplay, VTT-use, and more will remain unaffected by the update. Content released under 1.0a will also be unaffected.

The new update will also not contain any royalty structure or license back provisions. That was a concern by some thinking Wizards of the Coast would use it to steal work.

You can read Wizards of the Coast’s full statement here.

Paizo announces a System-Neutral Open RPG License

Open RPG

There’s been lots of chatter and rumors about Wizards of the Coast’s upcoming new version of its Open Gaming License (OGL) causing an unknown future in tabletop roleplaying. In response, Paizo has begun work on a new open, perpetual, and irrevocable Open RPG Creative License (ORC).

Since 2000, the OGL has improved the community, incubated creativity, and grown the business of not only the licensees but the licensor. A stated goal of a perpetual and irrevocable OGL was to ensure the establishment and longevity of gaming networks and to drive sales to both. Recent reinterpretation notwithstanding, it succeeded with roleplaying games seeing a golden age and creativity level not seen in decades. Many companies including Wizards of the Coast have benefitted from that growth.

The Open RPG Creative License (ORC) will be built system agnostic for independent game publishers under the legal guidance of Azora Law, an intellectual property law firm that represents Paizo and several other game publishers. Multiple leading publishers have already signed on to the effort to create a new and truly open license that allows all games to provide their own unique open rules reference documents that open up their individual game systems to the world.

You can find the complete details on Paizo’s blog.

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